ASLdeafined.com New Features and Deaf Experts!

I am thrilled to tell you about some major upgrades to ASLdeafined.com that happened August 15, 2016.

ASLdeafined has been undergoing an “Extreme” makeover during the exhaustive past four months.  These changes are now live.  The results are spectacular, and I am very pleased to share this announcement with you.  I want to invite you to review the results, as some of these changes are simply spectacular, designed for your optimum learning experience.

One of the most important changes features an all-Deaf instructional team executing the signs.  I solicited the help of the Deaf community to share their skills and knowledge to produce these awesome video lessons.  You will relish the opportunity to get to know these 6 amazing Deaf individuals.  In addition to this change, check out some of the additional changes, and information below:

What new additions will you see on ASLdeafined.com?

  • Four distinct levels (you will see the level tags under lessons)
  • Sign variations in the dictionary, just under the synonyms
  • Handshape reinforcement
  • Handshape category feature
  • Grammar instruction and activities
  • Expressive section with English and ASL translations
  • Double the number of lessons.
  • 15,000 + words video dictionary
  • Exposure to 6 Deaf experts
  • Deaf jokes
  • Receptive skills challenges
  • Classifier lessons
  • Handshape lessons
  • Exceptional School Discount Program
  • Full site free trial

Here is what hasn’t changed on ASLdeafined.com:

  • Theme Lessons
  • Post-Lesson Retention Exercises
  • Immediate Activity Scores and Feedback
  • Individualized Progress Chart (Progress monitoring made easy)  
  •  Personalized Dashboard
  • Fingerspelling
  • Customizable Vocabulary List
  • Concept Words (Multiple Meaning Words)
  •  Information on Deaf Culture
  • ASL Grammar
  • Discounts for schools / teachers
  • Track student’s progress (for teachers)

I would like to personally invite you back to ASLdeafined.com, to see all of our new features.  You will be thrilled at the changes we’ve made, along with many additions to enhance your skill level in ASL.

If you have any questions, please let me know.  I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Kindest regards,

Paul Fugate

Founder of ASLdeafined.com

248-891-6549

It’s All in Your Face!

American Sign Language (ASL) has many unique attributes that helps signers with the understanding of expressed thoughts and ideas, such as the usage of facial expressions.  Now, not everyone will have their “face” (facial expressions) on all of the time.  However, the more expressions you exhibit, the greater the chance your message will be understood.

On occasion, deaf individuals may ask for clarifications because facial expressions are not present.  Now, if this were to happen, do not feel insulted, nor should you consider it rude.  Instead, change how you are signing the message, and merely add more facial expressions. Your facial expressions show if you are sad, mad, shocked, surprised, disappointed, happy, jovial, etc.  Use them to the best of your ability.

Another feature of American Sign Language (ASL) that is critical to command while communicating with a deaf person is the use of your eyes.  While engaged in a conversation with a deaf person, you should be looking at the deaf person the entire time while conversation is taking place.  However, if for any reason, you break eye contact, it is considered rude.  Now, I can just imagine what you are thinking as a hearing person.  There are numerous times when we hear something, and we automatically look to the source of the noise for an explanation.  However, you have to try your best to break that habit of looking away when you hear a noise, or if someone is calling your name while you are conversing with a deaf person.   So, if someone is calling your name, or trying to get your attention while you’re signing with a deaf individual, what can you do in this situation?  (Can you just feel another poll coming up?).

[polldaddy poll=5251893]

 

Another way to use your eyes while conversing in ASL is with eye gazes.  You may be talking about a certain person in the room, but the deaf person doesn’t quite follow who you are referring to.  So, with a quick and swift eye gaze over to the person you are (so secretly) talking about, you can let the deaf person know who it is, and make it easier for them to follow the conversation.  You can also use your nose and head in the same sense.  For example, a mere twitch of your nose can be used to indicate a person “over there”, which is similar to a tilt of the head to point out the presence of someone.  Who knew that learning American Sign Language could be this much fun?

The Word of the Day

The Word of the Day  –  “Clean”

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Word of the Day – “Change”

Word of the Day – “Change”

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Can You Guess the Fingerspelled Word?

Can You Guess the Fingerspelled Word?

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Guess this phrase

Do you know what Mercy is signing?

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Word of the Day – “Justice”

Word of the Day – “Justice”

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